Lopez

Donald Lopez to Speak on Buddhism and Science

9780226493206On Tuesday, April 22, Donald Lopez, Jr., Ph.D., Arthur E. Link Distinguished University Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan, will present a talk at Le Moyne College entitled, “Buddhism and Science: Past, Present, and Future.” The lecture, which is part of the McDevitt Center’s series on “Science and Religion in Modern America,” will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel and is free and open to the public.

Lopez’s talk will provide a brief history of the relationships between Buddhism and science and offer some reflections on what is at stake as the teachings of an ancient Asian sage are offered as solutions to the problems of the modern world.

indexLopez received his Doctorate from the University of Virginia and has since written widely on Indian Mahayana Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism, the European encounter with Buddhism, the formation of the category of Modern Buddhism, and claims for the compatibility of Buddhism and science. He is a prolific author, having written, edited, or translated a number of books, most recently From Stone to Flesh: A Short History of the Buddha (University of Chicago Press, 2013) and In Search of the Christian Buddha: How an Asian Sage Became a Medieval Saint with Peggy McCracken (W. W. Norton & Company, 2014).

For more information about Dr. Lopez’ lecture or the series of lectures on Science and Religion in Modern America, please contact the McDevitt Center at 315-445-6200 or mcdevittcenter@lemoyne.edu.

 

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McDevitt IS Scholars to Present Research Findings

Ten McDevitt Information Systems Scholars, mentored by Dr. Martha Grabowski (McDevitt Chair in Information Systems), have spent the 2013-2014 academic year researching various issues surrounding Google Glass, Big Data, and Disaster Management and Preparedness.

On Friday, April 11, 2014 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the James Commons Special Events Room they will present the fruits of their research at the annual Le Moyne College Scholars Day Conference.  Each will offer a brief presentation followed by a question and answer period.  We encourage our followers to attend the conference.  It is free and open to the public.

Schedule for McDevitt Scholars:

Rebecca Wolf ’14

9:00 a.m – 9:15 a.m
Rebecca Wolf ‘14, Management and Leadership and Information Systems
“GoogleGlass: Authentication, Security, and Privacy”

10:15 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Dara DeGennaro ’15, Business Analytics and Information Systems
“Arctic Shipping Patterns in the Bering Strait”

11:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
James Cochran ’14, English and Religious Studies
“The Fat Lady, Kao and Christ: A Study of Sacramentality in Salinger’s Fiction”

1:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Ashley Strazzella ’14, Biological Sciences and Physics
“A Study of the Integration of Eastern and Western Medicine: A Literature Review of Challenges, Successes, and Forthcomings of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)”

2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Nicholas Olin ’16, Chemistry and Psychology
“Google Glass in the Emergency Medical Field”

4:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Jean-Phillipe Rancy ’15, Management and Information Systems
Michaella Steinruck ’16, Management and Information Systems
“GlassScapes: Virtualization in Google Glass”

3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Poster Session
Gabe Adams ’17, Computer Science
Morgan Thomas ‘14/’15, Physics, Masters of Science in Electrical Engineering
Steve Weiter ’15, Computer Science
“Google Glass Applications for Performing Arts”

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Learn More About George V. Coyne, McDevitt Chair of Religious Philosophy

20100111cnsbr00088Rev. George V. Coyne, McDevitt Chair of Religious Philosophy recently spoke with Sonja Meyer Duntley, staff writer at Syracuse.com, about his role at the Vatican Observatory in Castel Gandolfo, Italy where he served as its director for nearly three decades.  During his tenure at the Vatican Observatory, Father Coyne launched new educational and research initiatives, carried out planetary research, and helped to shape the views of the Catholic Church on key scientific questions.  In his talk with Syracuse.com, Father Coyne discusses his role as Director of the Observatory, his personal scientific expertise, his thoughts on the concept of intelligent design, and his current duties as Endowed McDevitt Chair of Religious Philosophy at Le Moyne College.

Read the interview here: http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2014/03/le_moyne_professor_a_former_vatican_observatory_director_devotes_his_career_to_b.html?fb_action_ids=786382198053558&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_ref=s%3DshowShareBarUI%3Ap%3Dfacebook-like&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582#comments

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McDevitt Scholar Steven Houck Examines Bird Migration Patterns

Using 81 years of data provided by the Forbush Bird Club (Worcester, MA), Steven Houck ’14, McDevitt Scholar in Ecology, and Dr. Donald McCrimmon, McDevitt Research Associate, are analyzing changes in 102 springtime bird migration patterns in Worcester, Massachusetts. Houck and McCrimmon began their analysis with the turkey vulture, a species typically found in the southern United States.  According to the data, this species is showing evidence of becoming a permanent resident in the Worcester area.  They have discovered that some species are arriving earlier due to temperature increases whereas other species are no longer migrating at all.

Houck and McCrimmon, assisted by Christopher Klee ’15 in the summer of 2014, will also assess apparent differences in species’ abilities to adjust arrival dates due to warming temperatures, with special attention to the differences in species that migrate longer as compared to shorter distances.

Their research will be presented and published in the near future.

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Rubenstein Interviews

This Tuesday, March 11 at 7:00 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel on the Le Moyne College campus, Dr. Mary-Jane Rubenstein will present a lecture entitled “Multiverse Cosmologies at the Limits of Science.”  In this talk, Rubenstein will briefly introduce different models of the multiverse in order to address its central questions: How did an infinite number of inaccessible universes become a respectable scientific hypothesis? What distinguishes multiverse cosmologies from metaphysics, fiction, or mythology? And can these distinctions hold, or does the emergence of multiverse cosmologies herald a reconfiguration of the very categories of physics, philosophy, and religion?

MaryJaneRubenstein-WorldsWithoutEnd-coverThis past February, Dr. Rubenstein released her second book, Worlds Without End: The Many Lives of the Multiverse (Columbia University Press, 2014).  The highly acclaimed monograph explores the concept of a multiverse cosmology, linking contemporary models of the multiverse to their forerunners.  In an interview with Andrew Aghapour, a writer for ReligionDispatches.org, Rubenstein discusses the inspiration behind her book, how the multiverse concept is “shaking-up” scientific and theological thought, and where her research is taking her next.

Read the interview here:  http://www.religiondispatches.org/books/science/7539/does_multiverse_theory_bring_theology_into_science

Worlds Without End will be available for purchase and signing at Tuesday’s lecture.

In a more personal interview with The Wesleyan Argus from 2010, Dr. Rubenstein discusses her relationship with books: revealing her favorites, those that influenced her life and work, and her favorite bookstores.

Read the interview here: http://wesleyanargus.com/2010/12/03/mary-jane-rubenstein-on-her-most-beloved-bookstores/

Welseyan Thinks Big, Dec. 4, 2012.

Mary-Jane Rubenstein to Speak on Multiverse Cosmologies

On Tuesday, March 11, Mary-Jane Rubenstein, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Religion at Wesleyan University, will present a talk at Le Moyne College entitled “Multiverse Cosmologies at the Limits of Modern Science.”  The lecture, which is part of the McDevitt Center’s series on “Science and Religion in Modern America,” will begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel and is free and open to the public.

Rubenstein’s talk will briefly introduce different models of the multiverse in order to address its central questions: How did an infinite number of inaccessible universes become a respectable scientific hypothesis? What distinguishes multiverse cosmologies from metaphysics, fiction, or mythology? And can these distinctions hold, or does the emergence of multiverse cosmologies herald a reconfiguration of the very categories of physics, philosophy, and religion?

MaryJaneRubenstein-WorldsWithoutEnd-coverRubenstein received her bachelor’s degree in Religion and English from Williams College (Massachusetts); she holds master’s and doctoral degrees in Philosophical Theology and Philosophy of Religion from Cambridge University (United Kingdom) and Columbia University.  She is an accomplished lecturer, having presented over forty talks in the United Kingdom and across the United States since 1999.  In addition to having authored numerous articles, book reviews, and book chapters, she has written Strange Wonder:  The Closure of Metaphysics and the Opening of Awe (Columbia University Press, 2009) and Worlds without End: The Many Lives of the Multiverse (Columbia University Press, 2014).

For additional information on this lecture, please contact the McDevitt Center at 315-445-6200 or mcdevittcenter@lemoyne.edu.

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Candy Gunther Brown to speak on “Does Prayer Heal the Sick”

This Thursday, February 27 at 5:30 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel on the Le Moyne College campus, Dr. Candy Gunther Brown will present a lecture entitled “Does Prayer Heal The Sick.”  (The lecture is free and open to the public.)  In her talk, Brown will consider whether scientific evidence should be used to evaluate claims of healing through prayer.  She will address what medical records, clinical studies, surveys and long-term follow up reveal about the effects of praying for healing.

In preparation for Dr. Brown’s lecture, we would like to provide our readers with an opportunity to become more familiar with her background and research.  She is the author of Testing Prayer: Reflections on Religion and Alternative Medicine, a blog on the “Psychology Today” website.  Her columns address such questions as: Can science prove the healing power of prayer? Why is complementary and alternative medicine supposed to work? Is religion good (or bad) for your health? How do we understand miracles and demons in a scientific age?

Access the blog here: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/testing-prayer

In this brief interview from January 2014, published on Religion in American History, Brown briefly discusses her background, field of study, and her current work re-examining religion in public schools.

Read the interview here: http://usreligion.blogspot.com/2014/01/four-questions-with-candy-gunther-brown.html

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Tanner, Nivison, and Wilckens Conduct Research in Costa Rica

CostaRica2This past January, Dr. Lawrence Tanner (Associate McDevitt Chair in Biology), Morgan Nivison’15 (Environmental Science Systems), and Megan Wilckens ’15 (Environmental Science Systems) traveled to the Monteverde Institute (a private educational-research organization) in Costa Rica to study the carbon dynamics of reforestation in the mountain cloud forests.  The Monteverde Institute provided them with assistance in the field and access to their data.

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Megan Wilckens ’15 examines tree roots while in Costa Rica

Tanner, Nivison, and Wilckens are trying to determine how long it takes for mature forests that have been cut down to recover all of the carbon lost from the forest and soil when the forest is allowed to regrow.  While in Costa Rica, they calculated the mass of all of the trees (by measuring their height and diameter) and the amount of carbon in the soil (by analysis of soil samples) in areas of mature forest, clear-cut land, and secondary forests of known age.  Nivison, who was responsible for the soil carbon portion of the project, will analyze the 300 samples collected; Wilckens, who did the tree measurements, will be responsible for calculating the carbon mass for approximately 1600 trees measured.  The results of their work will be submitted for publication and presented at the 9th Annual Le Moyne College Student Scholars Day held on April 11, 2014.

Candy Gunther Brown to Speak at Le Moyne

On Thursday, Feb. 27, Candy Gunther Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor at Indiana University Bloomington, will give a talk entitled “Does Prayer Heal the Sick?”  The lecture, sponsored by the McDevitt Center, and offered in conjunction with a course developed with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities Enduring Questions grants program, What Does Prayer Do?, will begin at 5:30 p.m. in the Panasci Family Chapel and is free and open to the public.

Brown’s talk will consider whether scientific evidence should be used to evaluate claims of healing through prayer.  She will address what medical records, clinical studies, surveys and long-term follow up reveal about the effects of praying for healing.

Brown, a historian and ethnographer of religion and culture, received her bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees from Harvard University.  She is the recipient of numerous awards, grants, and fellowships.  In addition to authoring a myriad of journal and newspaper articles, book chapters, op-eds, and press releases, Brown has published four books, including the highly regarded Testing Prayer: Science and Healing (Harvard University Press, 2012).

For additional information on this lecture, please contact the McDevitt Center at 315-445-6200 or mcdevittcenter@lemoyne.edu.

Supporting initiatives in Computer Science, Management/Information Systems, Physics, and Religious Philosophy at Le Moyne College.

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